Ancient Art of Smudging

Purify your home with a traditional Native American practice.
Home Cleansing: Set your intention. Tidy the home, cover mirrors, close windows, open interior doors (including cupboards), and turn off electronics. The herbs clear the energy, so you want lots of smoke (no flame). Move clockwise for positivity: concentrate on bringing in lightness, peace, clarity, serenity, prosperity: the emphasis for this direction is on invoking. Move counterclockwise to eliminate negativity: concentrate on old memories, psychic harm, and blocked energy: the emphasis is on banishing, or pushing out. Open the front door and waft the smoke out of the house; wait a moment. Outside, put the ashes on the doorstep to protect the entrance.

Day of the Dead

Día de los Muertos, celebrated in Mexico November 1 & 2. It is believed that the gates of heaven open at midnight October 31, and the spirits of deceased children (angelitos) are allowed to reunite with their families for 24 hours. On November 2, adult spirits come down to enjoy the festivities that are prepared for them.
Sugar skulls representing a departed soul, bore their name on the forehead and placed on the home offering or gravestone to honor the return of a particular spirit. Folk art Sugar Skulls wear big smiles, colorful icing and sparkly adornments. It is meant to be a respectful, happy time.

Ganesha

The son of Shiva and Parvati, Ganesha is the lord of success, the remover of obstacles, god of education, knowledge, wisdom and wealth. Ganesha’s elephant head symbolizes his wise soul, his trunk represents Om, the sound of cosmic reality. His human body signifies the earthly existence of human beings. The broken tusk he often holds like a pen is a symbol of sacrifice, which he broke to write the Mahabharata, a sacred Hindu text.

Himalayan Salt

BENEFITS: Himalayan Salt Lamps and T-Lights are believed to attract pollutants and neutralize air helping those with allergies and asthma, produce negative ions (a teeny bit), and neutralize the effects of electronics. They also help boost mood and energy levels, especially for those with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

CARE: Made from salt, they absorb moisture and can dissolve in water (are subject to water damage), so please be careful. Do not use water to clean. (Blow dry, or use a dry cloth).
For indoor use only.

Jizo

The protector of children, expectant mothers, and travelers in both the physical and spiritual realms. Jizo, is one of the most beloved and revered Bodhisattvas in Mahayana Buddhism.
His aspiration is the Bodhisattva Vow: to save all beings from suffering.
Portrayed with child-like features, often with hands together in greeting, he sometimes holds the “Dharma Jewel”, the calming light which banishes all fear.

Lotus

A common symbol in Tibetan Buddhism, the Lotus is viewed as a pure entity from which all things are birthed free of karma. It embodies the concepts of purity, of transcendence and non-duality.
The lotus flower is pure and beautiful above the water after birthing in the muck below. It symbolizes our human drama of challenges and suffering with the power to gracefully overcome obstacles. To rise above.

Shiva

Om Namo Shivaya

Shiva’s mantra chanted to destroy the darkness of the mind and lead one towards pure consciousness.
Shiva, The Auspicious One, is regarded as limitless, transcendent, unchanging and formless. Highly revered for his detachment, wisdom, and transformation in action. He is also regarded as the patron god of yoga and arts.

Weeping Yogi

Orang Malu, Weeping Yogi or Shy Man Buddha
It is believed that these hand-carved yogis take away your pain allowing you to enjoy life. Even though the Yogi cries for the world’s suffering, he can still be happy in his heart because he has found peace and joy from within. So give your sadness to the yogi and share your joys with those you love.
In essence; the yogi takes on your sorrows, so that you can be joyful!

Making Crystal Grids in Bali

The Story of the Happy Buddha

Quan Yin and the Dragon

What’s the Difference between the Fat and Skinny Buddha?